Archives For Introversion

This morning, I received an email from “Timehop Abe” indicating that one year ago today, I guest posted for Adam McHugh on patenting as introverted dad. Following is an excerpt:

“Coupled with my sinful nature, being an introverted parent leaves me
feeling nothing so much as guilt. I feel guilty when I take time to be by
myself, because it’s not always at an opportune time for my wife, or kids.
But the fact is, at least during the week, I’ve been at my job all day, been
engaging in “functional extroversion.” Though ostensibly my work is with
technology, it’s really in customer service–thus I must be amiable,
friendly, “chatty” throughout the day. I’m no less than exhausted when I get home. I find that I must retreat, must do something to replenish my mental and emotional stores. So it is that, because we have no office in our home, I sequester myself in the bathroom. It’s the one place where, mostly, I
won’t be bothered. This however does not keep my heart from feeling pangs of guilt when my children knock at the door, begging for my attention. It hurts me, it hurts them, but right then I literally have nothing to give. Not a
thing.”

Please head over to Adams’s blog, the Introverted Church, to read the rest.

Before we get down to business, just want to let you know that I’m guest posting for The Joseph Craven today. That post is called “Mr. Heinlein’s Lunch,” and can be found here. Please head on over and check it out.

'Help wanted sign' photo (c) 2011, Andreas Johannsen - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/I know I said there wouldn’t be a post today (on account of a posting at the aforementioned Gboat.net). I lied, ok?

Then again, this isn’t really a post in the traditional sense. Rather, I’m asking you for your help.

Recently, I posted on the rigors of being an introvert in the contemporary American church. This garnered a good response. That post is here

Also not long ago, I wrote about encountering an African American person for the first time (as a child). This led to a great comment, and a subsequent guest post from my friend, Ben Emerson.

Ben’s post is here

Which, too, got a good reader response. Ben is already working on a “sequel” to his original piece.

And that, my friends, is where you come in:

Do you have story of feeling marginalized in the church due to:

Introversion

Race (or failing to take racial and/or cultural differences into account)

Gender

I would love to read your story.

Also, maybe you were marginalized, or were in fact the “marginalizer?” If so, I want to hear from you, too. Tell me how God is expanding your world–shifting your paradigms–in this area.

Nota bene: only the honest need apply.

Send your submissions to: Chad Jones

Thank-you very much!

Recently at church I heard a lesson about the importance of building
margins into our lives. The irony of it was that this teaching came
from the pulpit of a megachurch. And generally speaking, it has been
my experience that most megachurches implicitly gravitate towards an
extroverted structure. Thus, for the introvert, there is very little
room for “margins.” (Or at least margins that an introvert would recognize).

Yet that is exactly where I feel I’m at when I’m attending service, or
trying to get involved: in the margins. Donald Miller
wrote–in Blue Like Jazz–“At the time I was attending this
large church in the suburbs. It was like going to church at the Gap. I
don’t know why I went there. I didn’t fit. I had a few friends,
though, very nice people.” I understand this. My family and I live
this. The only connection we have to our large church is a few
friends–friends we made via some activities our kids were once involved
in. Now it’s really our kids that keep us going back. If they didn’t
like it so much, I’m not sure we would.

Continue Reading…

Listen. Come a little closer. That’s right–here around the corner. I need to tell you something.

Please keep this in confidence, okay?

'Douche' photo (c) 2008, Mike Schmid - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Continue Reading…

>How to Care for Introvertsphoto © 2011 Heather T | more info (via: Wylio)

I am so thankful for the connections that the Internet, and blogging, have afforded me. Among those, and indeed the most recent, is with Presbyterian minister, and introvert, Adam McHugh. He is the author of the stellar book, Introverts in the Church. I highly recommend that you check it out.

Recently, Mr. McHugh interviewed author Jason Boyett about the effects his introversion has had on his faith journey. From this came numerous comments from introverted parents; so many, that McHugh, despite not being a parent himself, decided to spend a week hosting a series of guest posts from introverted parents. To which I have the distinct privilege of contributing (from reading this blog, you may be surprised to learn that, in fact, I am an introvert. All I can say is that writing is decidedly different from speaking, and no, I definitely do not wear my heart on my sleeve in real life. This blog is a reflection of my interior life).

Following is a portion of my post:

Coupled with my sinful nature, being an introverted parent leaves me
feeling nothing so much as guilt. I feel guilty when I take time to be by
myself, because it’s not always at an opportune time for my wife, or kids.
But the fact is, at least during the week, I’ve been at my job all day, been
engaging in “functional extroversion.” Though ostensibly my work is with
technology, it’s really in customer service–thus I must be amiable,
friendly, “chatty” throughout the day. I’m no less than exhausted when I get home. I find that I must retreat, must do something to replenish my mental and emotional stores. So it is that, because we have no office in our home, I sequester myself in the bathroom. It’s the one place where, mostly, I
won’t be bothered. This however does not keep my heart from feeling pangs of guilt when my children knock at the door, begging for my attention. It hurts me, it hurts them, but right then I literally have nothing to give. Not a
thing.

Please head over to Adams’s blog, the Introverted Church, to read the rest.

Thank-you so much for reading, and for your support: it has meant the world to me.

God bless,

Chad