Archives For church culture

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Halloween is coming, and with it hordes of the undead. They will be descending upon your doorsteps in countless, shambling, ravenous hordes.

Do you have a plan?

They will show up hungry, demanding of you not flesh, but candy. Metric tons of it.

You can:

1) Hide–leave your lights off. Don’t open the door. You never know who’s out there these days. Play dead.

2) Open your door, pass out sweets, embrace the fun of it. Make it not about death, but life. People long for community, connection. Make it happen!

3) Go outside–embrace your neighbors, get to know them. You might find they’re not so different after all. Chances are very good that most people you meet aren’t satanists out to hex you. The point is: how are we to be salt and light if we’re not interacting with people outside the household of faith?

4) Go to your church’s harvest festival–but invite your neighbors. Salt set apart by itself has no savor.

4) Along with candy, procure and pass out copies of Clay Morgan’s excellent book, Undead: Revived, Resuscitated, Reborn. In it he tells, in a wise, witty, well-researched yet accessible, way tales of the undead from the New Testament. In fact, read it for yourself, and you may just find yourself better prepared to face those undead hordes coming for your candy.
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Just my $.02, folks.

What do you think?

Recently at church I heard a lesson about the importance of building
margins into our lives. The irony of it was that this teaching came
from the pulpit of a megachurch. And generally speaking, it has been
my experience that most megachurches implicitly gravitate towards an
extroverted structure. Thus, for the introvert, there is very little
room for “margins.” (Or at least margins that an introvert would recognize).

Yet that is exactly where I feel I’m at when I’m attending service, or
trying to get involved: in the margins. Donald Miller
wrote–in Blue Like Jazz–“At the time I was attending this
large church in the suburbs. It was like going to church at the Gap. I
don’t know why I went there. I didn’t fit. I had a few friends,
though, very nice people.” I understand this. My family and I live
this. The only connection we have to our large church is a few
friends–friends we made via some activities our kids were once involved
in. Now it’s really our kids that keep us going back. If they didn’t
like it so much, I’m not sure we would.

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