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Noah Has Sailed Into Stores

noah giveaway_1

As you may, or may not, know, the Noah movie has been released on Blu-Ray/DVD/Digital. This movie generated quite a bit of dialogue both before, and during, it’s theatrical release. While we as Christians may not agree with the artistic license Darren Aronofsky employed in making the film, I think we can all agree that he had that right. Before we get into a debate about the movie’s artistic merits, or lack thereof, we would do well do remember that written works (such as the Bible is) and films are very different artistic mediums. What works well on the page doesn’t always translate to the screen. And the account of Noah as recorded in Scripture is very short. It is also completely without conflict. What I’m saying is that Mr. Aronofsky had scripted, and filmed, his movie with slavish adherence to the text it wouldn’t be a movie worth seeing: it would be woefully short, and without conflict.

Conflict is what drives stories. At their most basic, stories are about a character who wants something, and undergoes conflict to get it. In an industry dominated by the almighty dollar, name me a studio that would finance a wide theatrical release films which clocks in about twenty minutes. Who would pay to see that? (I wouldn’t. Movies are frightfully expensive these days. I’m not plunking down my hard-earned scratch on something unless it tells a compelling story. It has to be worth my time). There isn’t one. Added to that is that fact that Hollywood, by and large, isn’t in the business of catering to Christians. Why should we expect them to do so? Is that reasonable? In Celebrate Recovery, they have a maxim that goes: “Accepting this sinful world, as Jesus did, as it is, and not as I would have it to be.” Which is to say that, as people of faith, we would do well to moderate our expectations of the entertainment product coming of the movie industry. They, being very being very much interested in the bottom line, have to make a product which appeals to the broadest audience possible. That said, I have no compunction about avoiding most of the films, T.V. shows, what have which originate there. I know very well what the Scripture says about the love of money being a root of all kinds of evil.

That’s a given.

In this particular case, that of Noah, yes, Aronofsky used both the Bible, and extra-biblical sources (midrash, etc). We may not agree with that. We may not like all of his choices, or the way Noah is depicted on screen. However, let’s not forget the one, singular truth here: a director has been given the greenlight to make a big budget film about Noah, the ark, sin, justice, forgiveness, redemption. Again, we may not agree with everything that takes place on screen. Nevertheless, the fact that this film was made gives us a giant opportunity to talk about: Noah, the ark, sin, justice, forgiveness, and redemption. Let’s not miss the forest for the trees here. The good news is that the Bible has been brought back into the multiplex in a big way (this December, director Ridley Scott’s Exodus Gods and Kings will bow).

My opinion? When God hands us an opportunity this large we best use it. People that aren’t normally open to discussing the Bible will be open, will have questions.

And we need to be there… with the Good News.

And there’s more good news for anyone reading this post: in conjunction with Grace Hill Media, I’m giving away a special edition box set of Noah. Just follow the instructions below:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

A Word About Men

Men are people. People have feelings. As such, we have feelings, too. We are not out to get you. Just having a penis doesn’t make one:

Bad

The enemy

An abuser

A potential rapist

It’s not our fault that your childhood was tough, or that male figures in your past abused their positions of authority, or violated your trust.

It’s not fair to view us all through the crap-stained lens of your past.

Just as you do, we have our own struggles, our baggage, our own stories to contend with. If you prick us, we will bleed. If you try to shoehorn us into a role to accommodate your worldview, we’re not going to take it very well.

We, having feelings–minds, hearts, opinions–of our own probably won’t take it very well. We might get loud.

This is not abuse, or bullying: this is usually the cry of a hurting heart. Yes, we may be bigger than you, stronger than you, louder than you… this still doesn’t make us the big, scary, nasty man out to get you. It’s a sign of hurt, of pain, of confusion.

If you accuse us unfairly, we will get defensive. It’s human nature.

Being men doesn’t make us demons.

So stop demonizing us for for our gender, for your past abusive relationships.

And let us love you.

That’s what our strength is for.

Life Is What We’re Looking For

The late, great G.K. Chesterton once said that every an who knocks on the door of a brothel is looking for God. Meaning that that man is looking for something he can’t quite identify, and is trying to assuage this longing with sex. While we may not ever darken the doors of a bordello, we do this, too:

We look for God in things.

I suppose we should back up a bit here, define our terms. What is God? The Bible says that He is love. To which I would add: He is life. As Pascal said, we all come with a “God-shaped blank” in center of our beings.

A whole in our souls.

Thing is, we try to fill this whole with things, with relationships, with sex, with food. Every time I cram two, or three, donuts down my gullet I’m looking for soemthing, I’m believing something:

These will give me life. It’s the same reason I take vitamins: I want more life. When I eat those donuts, or drink that extra beer, I’m trying to fill this perceived lack of life within me. (I’m not here saying that these things are in and of themselves bad).

The problem here is that Christ has already come in, given me (us) life. And yet I still look to things,  to experiences, to fill me.

This is nothing other than idolatry.

Which to my mind is the root of all manner of sins.

We are idolatrous, the lot of us, when we try to find life in anything other than God. I’m not saying the things shouldn’t be enjoyed; rather that they should be enjoyed in the right time, and way.

Where are you finding life today?

We Lost the War

For decades it seems the American church has been fighting a war on culture. Well, we’ve lost. I don’t say this lightly, but it also seems pretty clear that we marched into battle under faulty premises. I mean when are we ever  mandated to convert the culture in which we find ourselves to some semblance of Christian conduct?

Is it even reasonable to expect Christian conduct, or morals, from culture? From the world? I submit it is not. Moreover, we’re not even on the same page when it comes to values.

So we’ve fought a war, which we’ve arguably lost, and awoken in a world we don’t recognize… Because we didn’t fight biblically. Pop quiz:

Where was the Apostle Paul most effective–on Mars Hill, where he tried to be culturally relevant, or with the Phillippian jailer? How about Jesus? Was He after the masses, or the individual? You see, those of us who believe serve a God Who isn’t all about efficiency. He wants the one lost sheep who’s strayed, scans the horizon for signs of the prodigal son, tells the woman with the issue of blood that her faith has healed her… Or the woman caught in adultery to go, and sin so more.

Was the command to go into all the world and save the culture, or rather was it to make disciples? You see, it’s easy to lionize Hollywood, or lambsaste the gay agenda.

But it’s hard to confront the sin in our own hearts, check our motives, and then go forth with the message of God’s love.

For individuals.

It’s easy to write off entire segments of the populace. It’s far harder to love those souls for whom Christ died.

Changed lives don’t happen culturally, or societally, but rather face-to-face, one-on-one.

But we’re afraid, hiding in our holy huddles. It’s no wonder we’ve lost the war.

But it’s not too late.

Wake up, church: the weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God.

Let God Sort It Out

Dr. Karl Meninger wrote years ago, asking Whatever Became of Sin?

Good question, doc. Because that line keeps getting pushed further and further out. Things, only a generation ago, which were considered sin are now not only not, well, sin, but are approved of, applauded.

The collective consciousness (and conscience) it would seem have been given over. This shouldn’t surprise us. It’s there in the scriptures: Romans chapter one: “And God gave them over…”

I’m not here calling out any one particular sin, but a general trend in what is arguably a post-christian society. We (at least we here in America) can’t even agree if this country was ever a “Christian nation,” whether–or not–it was founded on biblical principles.

No, everbody–left, right, centrist, liberal, conservative, progressive–is too busy planting flags, claiming territory. Everybody is saying that God is on their respective side in this cultural divide. (I write here of those who particularly claim to be in the church).

But what does God say?

Matthew 13:24-30 ESV

“He put another parable before them, saying, “The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field, but while his men were sleeping, his enemy came and sowed weeds among the wheat and went away. So when the plants came up and bore grain, then the weeds appeared also. And the servants of the master of the house came and said to him, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? How then does it have weeds?’ He said to them, ‘An enemy has done this.’ So the servants said to him, ‘Then do you want us to go and gather them?’ But he said, ‘No, lest in gathering the weeds you root up the wheat along with them. Let both grow together until the harvest, and at harvest time I will tell the reapers, Gather the weeds first and bind them in bundles to be burned, but gather the wheat into my barn.’”

Yes, I know the scriptures tell us that we shall know them by their fruits. I’m just sick of arguing. So I’m going to propose a new tack:

Instead of going out on tare patrol, I’ll instead leave the question of who’s in, or who’s out to God. Apparently, He has plan. I have sneaking suspicion that we’ll all be shocked on that day as to who are actually wheat, and who are tares. And the simple fact is that all that each of us can do is reflect Jesus to the best of our abilities.

We never win by arguing. Because people are no longer persuaded by logic. No; they’re looking for love, looking to be heard and understood. They’re looking for a shared connection via a shared story. Let us not forget that the Bible is first a story: God’s story. It’s a story of how He, Creator of all that is seen, and unseen, wants a relationship with each one of us.

It is love which will persuade hearts–not carefully crafted persuasive arguments. Or vitriolic vilifications. First, folks want to know how much we care–before they can even begin to care about what we know. We’re not even on the same page regarding what is, and what is not, sinful. There isn’t a common morality to come to any consensus upon.

There’s just this:

Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so.

I’m not here talking about being soft on sin; rather, it’s about being soft on the hearts of folks who don’t even know they’re sinners in the first place.

As Jesus was…

Live a life of love, and let God sort it out, my friends. He knows who’s wheat, and who’s a tare.

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